Idiom: Straight from the horse's mouth

Straight from the horse’s mouth

Meaning

  • directly from the person who knows the most about the matter; someone who knows the facts.
  • from a dependable or reliable source
  • from the highest authority
  • from someone who has personal knowledge
  • from a direct or firsthand source

Examples

“I heard Andy got angry and quit this morning!” “Well, I can confirm it’s true since I had lunch with Andy and heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.”

Look, if you don’t believe me, go over to Sarah right now and get it straight from the horse’s mouth.

I know it’s true because I got it straight from the horse’s mouth – Katie told me herself.

I have it straight from the horse’s mouth that the boss is retiring

He has got to hear it from the horse’s mouth. 

Most of the book is completely true; it comes from the horse’s mouth.

— I never would’ve believed she got expelled from her boarding school if I hadn’t heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.

— “How do you know they broke up?”   “I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.  Right after they had a huge fight Sandy called to let me know what happened.”

— I’m going to call a staff meeting to talk about the layoffs—our employees deserve to hear it straight from the horse’s mouth.

— Sorry but it’s confidential. If you want that information you’ll have to get it straight from the horse’s mouth.

— I’m tired of all of the rumours. I’m want to hear it straight from the horse’s mouth if it’s true.

— Sally’s best friend confessed to her mother that she and Candy have been smoking pot for months. I want to hear it straight from the horse’s mouth though so please come home as soon as you can so we can speak with her together.

— I hate rumours because they’re often inaccurate—I always try to get the news straight from the horse’s mouth whenever I can.

— Be careful about the rumours that float around the school—so many of them are wrong that I only believe what I hear straight from the horse’s mouth.

— The company’s CEO is coming to the staff meeting this morning so we’ll be able to hear all of the latest news and developments straight from the horse’s mouth.

Origin

The origin of this phrase has reference to horse racing. Tips on the likely winner are circulated among the punters. The most trusted source are the ones closest to the horse, the stable boys. The phrase goes one step further and better, i.e, from the horse itself. It has been used since the early 1900s.


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